Brightleaf sells document automation technologies—and technology-leveraged services—that help lawyers work more quickly, efficiently, accurately, collaboratively, and profitably.  We deploy those technologies and services at law firms and in-house legal departments.  Our customers at those firms and departments use Brightleaf to improve contract creation and contract negotiation…and to gain greater contract intelligence over their executed transactions. We make […]

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Much is made in certain states about lawyers’ continuing education. In New York, everyone bemoans the often boring and somewhat difficult to obtain “ethics credits.” Here in Massachusetts, a proposed class for newly minted lawyers on how to run a practice can be traced to the lawyer unemployment numbers, the idea being that lawyers can’t […]

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According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the total number of lawyer jobs in the U.S. is expected to rise to 801,800 by 2020.  In 2010, there were 728,200 U.S. lawyer jobs.  That means we’re looking at a projected increase of 73,600—or just over 10%—over the span of the present decade. So, yay….job growth. That’s the good news. Here’s […]

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At Brightleaf we’re big Trinity Law Group fans: they’re super-sharp, well-connected, deeply experienced business lawyers with a model that perfectly suits entrepreneurial tech companies.  Nice guys, too. Also, TLG co-founder Walter Wright co-hatched the idea that became Brightleaf and in our early days patiently raised and fed the fledgeling company until it was ready to leave […]

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Now that we’re done shoveling snow, we can turn to this interesting article from yesterday’s Wall Street Journal.  The theme suggested by its title, “Big Law Firms Keep Lid on Associate Bonuses,” is hardly new or suprising.  Given the overall economic climate, nobody really expected associate compensation to skyrocket.  What’s worth noting however is this little graph […]

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Online newsmagazine Slate checked in yesterday with this story about how law schools acting in their own financial interest are creating an oversupply of debt-laden grads who cannot find jobs in the legal profession.  While the article doesn’t contain much in the way of shocking new revelations, it very nicely summarizes the disconnect between how prospective J.D.’s […]

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Kraft Kennedy’s Michael Mills writes about legal document assembly (and Brightleaf) in this month’s issue of Legal Technology News.  Mills comes to Kraft-Kennedy from 20 years at Davis Polk, much of it spent heading the firm’s knowledge management and technology functions, so he knows of what he speaks.

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Foley & Lardner announced today that it was lauching an online teaching series called “Entrepreneurship Talks: An Interactive Learning Audio Conference Series Focused on Emerging Companies and Start-Ups.”   From the official release, it looks like there will be at least four separate talks in the series, starting off with March 23rd’s “You’ve Launched Your Business…Now […]

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Seyfarth Shaw is not your typical 739-lawyer firm.   For one thing, in the midst of an economic downturn, and in the face of what the Association of Corporate Counsel terms a “slow-motion riot” by corporate clients everywhere, Seyfarth reported gains in gross revenues (+ 5.5%), net profits(+3.5%), and profits-per-partner (+5.5%) last year. In an AmLaw Daily interview several […]

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Today’s National Law Journal leads with a report of plunging “lawyer population” (their term, not mine) at the AmLaw 250.  The article lead is stark: “the United States’ largest law firms this year suffered the deepest cuts in their attorney numbers since The National Law Journal began tracking their census figures more than 30 years ago.” All […]

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More and more legal departments are paying less and less to their outside counsel and are adopting a variety of strategies to achieve that reduction in spending.  The list of these strategies vary from the traditional (keep more work in-house) to the more novel (ban first-year or even second-year associates from working on their projects), but […]

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